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St. Louisans aren’t accustomed to thinking of our home as a center of innovation. Yet in the twentieth century, St. Louis was at the forefront of the brand-new aviation industry: Charles Lindbergh’s plane was called the Spirit of St. Louis because of his St. Louis investors, our fledgling airport grew to host once-mighty TWA, and McDonnell-Douglas produced the Mercury and Gemini spacecraft. We were leaders in the field! To rekindle some of that “gee whiz” feeling, the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; 314-746-4599 or www.mohistory.org) presents the new exhibit Flight City: St Louis Takes to the Air. Artifacts, photographs and interactive displays chart the history of St. Louis’ role in the advancement of flight, and also look toward the future of the science. Flight City opens at 10 a.m. daily and remains up through Friday, September 28; admission is $2 to $5 (free on Tuesdays).
June 3-Sept. 28, 2007

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