Missouri Doctor Who Amputated Patient's Toe on His Porch Has License Revoked

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You would cry too if it happened to you. - VIA FLICKR/DAN4TH NICHOLAS

A Missouri doctor has had his license to perform medicine revoked after amputating a man's toe on his porch.

The Springfield News-Leader reports that John Ure, a 73-year-old physician who practiced in Deepwater, Missouri — a tiny rural town about four hours southwest of St. Louis — hacked off a patient's gangrenous toe on the back porch of his office in May 2016.



Documents filed in June by the Missouri State Board of Registration for the Healing Arts resulted in the revocation of Ure's physician and surgeon licenses, saying that the procedure had been done in a "non-sterile environment."

Those same documents say that Ure's office doubled as a machine shed, had no restroom or running water, and did not even contain an examination table.



The board further notes that, according to medical records, no antibiotics were administered before or after the toe was chopped off.

In a hearing back in January, Ure appeared without an attorney and testified on his own behalf, according to the News-Leader, mentioning his personal and educational background and explaining the corrective actions he planned to take. But the board was not swayed.

Reached for comment on Wednesday, Ure told the Associated Press that he was just helping out a friend who refused to go to a hospital. He claims his surgical instruments were "perfectly sterile."

Ure is ineligible to file for reinstatement for two years, according to the board's order. No word on the whereabouts of the toe.

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