Mother Claims She's Possessed, Then Proves It

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Bradie Simpson was possessed by something all right.
  • Bradie Simpson was possessed by something all right.
A Camden County woman went to the pastor of the First Baptist Church of Camdenton in October and handed over her infant daughter, saying that she was possessed and she feared she was going to hurt the child. On February 4, the woman apparently proved her premonition true.

A day earlier, Bradie R. Simpson, 39, called the police to her mobile home claiming her neighbor had shot himself. The neighbor was fine, and the police left. Several hours later, sheriff's deputies were called back again, this time by Simpson's son. He told them his mother had disappeared, and that there was a bloody knife in the bedroom.

Police searched the area, and discovered a grisly scene in the woods according to the probable cause statement.

At approximately 4:00 AM Deputies located Simpson seated in a wooded area approximately 225 feet from the residence. As Deputies approached Simpson they observed her to be holding (child's name redacted). They further observed (child) to be unresponsive and covered in blood. Deputies attempted to communicate with Simpson, asking her several times what happened. Simpson was conscious and appeared alert but did not respond. Deputies were able to identify at least one lacerated injury crossing (the child's) throat and immediately took (the child) from Simpson for the purpose of emergency medical attention. Simpson also had what appeared to be a lacerated wound on her neck and was escorted to the roadway for medical attention.
Police then searched the trailer and found no signs of break-in or struggle. They did find two metal spoons and a small baggie containing heroin residue in Simpson's bedroom.

The child was in critical condition at a local hospital as of Sunday. Simpson remains in custody.

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