The 10 Best Concerts in St. Louis This Weekend: September 25 to 27

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Hands and Feet performs at Brave New World, an annual event organized by the Farfetched Collective, taking place at the Luminary on Friday. - PHOTO BY KELSEY COOK
  • Photo by Kelsey Cook
  • Hands and Feet performs at Brave New World, an annual event organized by the Farfetched Collective, taking place at the Luminary on Friday.
Hot off the heels of the funk and metal festivals in recent weeks, St. Louis brings big shows for fans of folk and blues. The Atomic Blues Festival takes place on Atomic Cowboy's outdoor stage on Saturday while the St. Louis Folk and Roots Festival stretches across the whole weekend at the Sheldon and Strauss Park. Fans of hip-hop should hit up the Luminary on Friday for the Farfetched Collective showcase. East-side rapper Lo Luciano takes over Pop's Nightclub on Saturday for the release of his latest album HisStory along with a solid lineup. Afraid of new music? Bask in the glory days of your favorite bands at the Firebird for An Under Cover Weekend.

FRIDAY THROUGH SUNDAY
 
An Under Cover Weekend 9: Sept. 25-27
The Firebird
8:30 p.m. | $10 each night, $22 for all three shows
By Daniel Hill
An Under Cover Weekend has upped the ante to preposterous heights this year. In addition to its organizers' expanding of the event into a third night, the bands involved are clearly getting increasingly ambitious with their choices of tributes — blame the spirit of friendly competition that always seems to arise from this affair. The Potomac Accord as Fugazi? Rusty Nail as Black Sabbath? The Langaleers as Creedence Clearwater Revival? These are legendary bands with wholly unique sounds — but if anyone is equal to such a task, it is the abundantly talented St. Louis music community. Each year An Under Cover Weekend packs the Firebird and creates lasting memories for all in attendance. Expect no different this time around.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

Farfetched Presents: Brave New World 2015 w/ Hands and Feet, Loren D., Abnormal, Centipede, P.O.E.T. J, Mathias and the Pirates, Scrub, Blank Generation, Laren Loveless, Ewokie Talkie, Super Hero Killer
The Luminary
8 p.m. | $7-$10
The Farfetched Collective brings together electronic artists of many flavors, crossing down-tempo ambient work with buoyant hip-hop and dance music. All the bands in the Collective have one defining feature: the acts dare to explore beyond genre lines, making for fiercely independent music. Every year, this group convenes to address the state of its own union, where like-minded musicians reject the kind of dystopian future presented in Aldous Huxley's sci-fi classic, Brave New World.

St. Louis Folk and Roots Festival w/ the Tillers, Blind Boy Paxton, Anna & Elizabeth
The Sheldon
8 p.m. | $20
While the Tillers play bluegrass with tiny tinges of punk rock, don't mistake those rough edges for anything but passion. The Cincinnati trio builds songs up by laying tiny, twangy layers so it can peel them off with reckless abandon. Along with the Tillers, this two day fest brings Blind Boy Paxton and Anna & Elizabeth on Friday with a strong lineup of Sam Bush Band, Finnders and Youngberg the next night. Both shows are stacked, but Saturday's ticket will cost you double the asking price for Friday. For the freeloaders in the crowd: the fest ends on Sunday afternoon with an old-time fiddle contest in Strauss Park.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26

Bruxism 11 w/ Okendo, Another Pink World, David Burnett
Foam Coffee & Beer
8 p.m. | $5
This is the eleventh installment in Nathan Cook's bi-monthly series that offers a wide range of experimental acts in intimate spaces. Okendo is the solo effort of one J.J. Hamon, who performs a set of modular synth work with many circuits of his own design. He's well known for playing guitar in many bands about town, namely Magic City, Demon Lover and Beth Bombara. Another Pink World is the six-string alter ego of Joseph Raglani, who typically performs ambient electronic music via analog synth (an inverse to Hamon). David Burnett of Beauty Pageant opens the night, but what his set contains remains a mystery until show time. 

Les Gruff and the Billy Goat Album Release Show w/ Marie and the Americans, the Desert Fringe, Ben Sturdevant
Off Broadway
7 p.m. | $10
Songwriter Billy Croghan leads his band with melodies laid bare on the acoustic guitar. And while the name is mostly smoke and mirrors (this is not a duo and lacks a goat of any kind, much less one of the billy variety), it does show Croghan's penchant for using what simply sounds good to him at the time. His brand of Americana comes loaded with stories of the working class and simple struggles that are almost universally relatable. Underneath the sound comes an optimism missing from other bands of its ilk, bringing a little hope with a heavy helping of harsh reality. 

See also: Les Gruff & the Billy Goat to Release Self-Titled Album This Saturday


Lo Luciano Album Release Show w/ Crook3dmuziC, JAY SMOKA, Kokane The Rapper, Key Lo Da Don, Reup Von Wolfgang, No Sleep Gang, Kasze
Pop's Nightclub
7 p.m. | $5-$8
Presented by the Black Market Media Group, the release of rapper Lo Luciano's new record HisStory features eight acts performing rapid fire sets for a ticket price that evens out to roughly one dollar per performer. The show is a spitfire of heady beats with poets that range from party-style MCs to fierce players asserting themselves in today's rap game. Fans of hip-hop in general can get a strong dose of the east side — a sweeping introduction to the hip-hop happening right across the river. 

Stillwater w/ Peck of Dirt, Free Dirt
Schlafly Tap Room
9 p.m. | Free
By Christian Schaeffer
One of the great things about St. Louis music is that many of our beloved older bands don’t always stay broken up forever. Witness the reunions and rejuvenations of the last twelve months — bands such as the Three Merry Widows and Nadine have played shows after long absences, to say nothing of the second-coming fervor that attended the Urge’s reboot. Go ahead and add Stillwater to that list of born-again rock bands. After two records and some solid regional recognition, the trio hung it up in the late 1990s, though its guitar-heavy rumble became transmogrified in Chris Grabau’s next project, the long-running and amorphous Magnolia Summer. Grabau will reunite with bassist John O’Brien and Michael Rose for this free show, though time will tell if this appearance is more than a one-off among friends.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27

Atomic Blues Festival w/ Marsha Evans & the Coalition, Eugene Johnson & Company, Larry Griffin & Eric McSpadden, Big Mike & the Blues City All-Stars, Joe Pastors Legacy Ensemble, Paul Niehaus & Friends , Bob "Bumble Bee" Kamoske, Ethan Leinwand, the Bottoms Up Blues Gang, MC Marty Spikner
The Bootleg
3 p.m. | $10
Another week, another festival. But our city's restless love affair with big scale events helps bring the scene to the layman (you know, those of us who don't go to concerts each and every week). The Atomic Blues Festival is one killer introduction to this city's blues scene, which, for the record, is the genre St. Louis is known for. While Paul Niehaus, Mike Aguirre and Bob Kamoske are among many names you'll see in the blues bar circuit around town, this show brings those gigging musicians together on Atomic Cowboy's outdoor stage for an all-day affair in the sun. Expect collaborations, special covers and, of course, the occasional jam session. 

Beach House
The Pageant
8 p.m. | $25-$27.50
Google Beach House and you'll find articles that proclaim how overrated Beach House is, while nine other major media sites hold the band in high regard as an "unknown" or "underrated gem." Perspective is everything, and from the ground level, we've always seen Beach House for what it is: a duo that cranks out perfect shoegazey pop songs, if such a thing could even exist. Read more about the band's latest record in this week's print edition. 

See also: Baltimore's Beach House: "We've Been So Lucky to Do This Band"

D.R.I. w/ Grand Inquisitor, Path of Might, Absala, Guy Morgan
Fubar
7 p.m. | $15-$18
By Daniel Hill
The legendary Dirty Rotten Imbeciles, better known simply as D.R.I., have finally returned. That's not to say the band that created the crossover sound hasn't repeatedly played St. Louis in the last few years — it has, certainly. But it wasn't until its most recent set in September of last year that the group really sounded right. Credit new drummer Brandon Karns, who handles the group's light-speed tempos with ease. Singer Kurt Brecht claims that Karns' inclusion has been fruitful enough to yield new music, too, which is remarkable considering D.R.I.'s last record was released in 1995. The new songs the group performed at that show displayed great promise; here's hoping something actually becomes of them.

Note: Though we wish we could, we can't feature every great show happening in town in just one post. Peruse the St. Louis concert calendar for more ideas, and let everyone know what else you're looking forward to seeing this weekend in the comments below. To be considered for coverage in RFT Music, submit show info online or drop us a line anytime.

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