Local Singer of "Ferret in the Closet Act II" Takes On America's Got Talent

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Today we bring you the latest news from Walt Winston, who was recently subjected to the America's Got Talent treatment. His friend was so incredibly pumped about this story we're about to share that he called RFT headquarters and freaked out over the phone. Thank you, friend of Walt's, for telling us about the latest travails of the local, charming and bespectacled singer-songwriter who earlier this month challenged traditional notions of both singing and songwriting with his bold entry on America's Got Talent. Those of you at home can begin by watching the clip below, in which he sings a creation of his called "Truck Drivers Aren't Supposed to Cry."

There are three aspects of Walt we're particularly fond of:

1. His lyrics are both autobiographical (he was once a truck driver) and genius. They're also kind of brave, if you think about it, and we get a kick out of a St. Louis native doing his somewhat strange thing on a national stage.

2. He looks like a member of The Beatles, though we have to put our foot down all over Howie Mandel's comparison to Ringo. He clearly looks a lot more like John. Added bonus: They're the dude's favorite band, which makes this that much more candy-coated.

3. He can tolerate Nick Cannon.

These things were all adorable and baffling enough before we found out the secret fourth addition to this list:

4. He has a YouTube channel. Said channel, which he maintains under the username walteria1964, includes both solo jams and the group work of Walt Winston and The Waltles, a name we cannot emphasize the brilliance of enough. As you click through his work, enjoy the highlights of a side of the local artist (and A to Z hero) that America proper did not get to see. We recommend starting with "Ferret in the Closet Act II" (below).

Read our 2002 feature story on Walt

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