Now You Can Tour Earthbound Beer's Cherokee Street HQ

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COURTESY OF EARTHBOUND BEER
  • COURTESY OF EARTHBOUND BEER
When Earthbound Beer (2724 Cherokee Street) opened its new brewery last September, it was actually moving into a building that is very old: the original stock house of Cherokee Brewing Co., dating back to the 1860s. Earthbound's renovations took two years — and included clearing 100 years of rubble out of the site's lagering cellars.

Those cellars aren't just a basement. They're part of the network of caves that run under Cherokee Street. And now you can see them for yourself.

Earthbound began offering tours last weekend, and co-owner Stuart Keating says they'll be running on Saturdays and Sundays going forward at 2, 4 and 6 p.m. (with the caveat that none will run this Sunday, since the Earthbound team will be heading to Scratch Brewing Co. for Oktoberfest).

Tours cost $15/person and include a walking beer. They last about 30 minutes.



Per Keating, "Highlights include the cellar, learning a lot about architecture and the history of the building from our brewer/tour guide Danielle, a bunch of authentic brewery smells, a walking beer, seeing all your friends in closed-toed shoes and our legendary 'laid back' service (from a 4 star Yelp review)."

Email rebecca@earthboundbeer.com to book your slot.

We welcome tips and feedback. Email the author at sarah.fenske@riverfronttimes.com

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