St. Louis-Made Video Game Crashlands Lands on Two Time "Best Of" Lists

by

comment
Sam and Seth Coster of Butterscotch Shenanigans. - PHOTO BY DANNY WICENTOWSKI
  • PHOTO BY DANNY WICENTOWSKI
  • Sam and Seth Coster of Butterscotch Shenanigans.
Somebody at Time really, loves St. Louis video game studio Butterscotch Shenanigans. No, really loves it.

The venerable magazine named Butterscotch’s surprise hit Crashlands to two of its major lists last month. On November 4, the publication included the mobile version of the galactic RPG adventure in its “50 Best Apps of the Year” collection, citing the old-meets-new vibe as a vital component to gaming today. Wrote the magazine,
“Killer aliens meets goofball storytelling and characters meets a weighty crafting system brimming with hundreds of recipes, Crashlands is everything predictable RPGs aren’t.” 

Pretty good, right? And on November 22, Time piled on even more praise when it listed Crashlands as No. 7 of “The Top 10 Video Games,” part of the media outlet's “Top 10 Everything of 2016” series. Crashlands was in good company, sharing space with big-name games like Dragon Quest Builders and Uncharted 4.



Time’s hype continues an outstanding year for Crashlands, which Butterscotch Shenanigans developed as a creative way for Sam Coster and his brothers Seth and Adam to deal with Sam’s non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The young studio — founded in 2012 — had some previous success with games Quadropus Rampage and Flop Rocket, but it also fielded some duds and needed a big hit to keep the lights on.

After a few years of development, Butterscotch launched Crashlands for both mobile and PC, and the rest is history. With outstanding reviews from IGN, Android Central and Game Informer (and, ahem, us), Crashlands found no shortage of fans, allowing Butterscotch to expand its studio and pursue its next adventure.



And Coster’s cancer? After intense treatment and some big scares, it appears to be gone, cementing 2016 as a triumph in more ways than one.

crashlands_launch_poster_800.jpg

Support Local Journalism.
Join the Riverfront Times Press Club

Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state. Our readers helped us continue this coverage in 2020, and we are so grateful for the support.

Help us keep this coverage going in 2021. Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing membership pledge, your support goes to local-based reporting from our small but mighty team.

Join the Riverfront Times Club for as little as $5 a month.