3 Art Openings Worth a Visit This Weekend

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Frank Trankina, Dream Cabinet, 2010. Oil on linen, 62 x 48 inches. Courtesy of the artist.
  • Frank Trankina, Dream Cabinet, 2010. Oil on linen, 62 x 48 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

If you're interested in art, this is your weekend — not only are there openings at Saint Louis Museum of Art and the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, but three new shows are premiering at Sheldon Art Galleries. Hit the four shows in Midtown and then head west to the Wash U. campus for full night of art.

Below, the details for all three locations.

Linda Skrainka: Reflections
Saint Louis University Museum of Art
3663 Lindell Boulevard | sluma.slu.edu
Opening 5 p.m. Fri., Mar. 4. Continues through May 15.

This critical survey of Linda Skrainka’s work features more than 50 paintings and drawings created by the native St. Louisan. Her interest in the small details that make each person’s life unique informs her work, which is in turn supported by excerpts from her journals. These written passages reveal her concerns about both her process and her technical skills. They also serve to place each piece in the larger context of her life.

Winter/Spring Exhibition
Sheldon Art Galleries
3648 Washington Boulevard | www.thesheldon.org
Opening 5-7 p.m. Fri., Mar. 4. Continues through May 7.

The Sheldon welcomes spring (it’s almost here) with three new exhibitions. The main galleries house Printmaking in St. Louis Now, a deep slice of the work being done by local fine art print presses and printmakers. Evil Prints, Firecracker Press and Pele Prints are all represented in the show, as are 27 individual artists, including Bunny Burson, Lisa Bulawsky, Alicia LaChance and Leslie Laskey. Meanwhile, Frank Trankina: Superheroes and Night Stories takes over the Nancy Spirtas Kranzberg Gallery. The Chicago painter crafts still-life portraits of vintage figurines and toys that often have a subtle narrative element. The Ann Lee and Wilfred Konneker Gallery is reserved for Susan Hacker Stang: reAPPEARANCES. These eight images were made using a toy digital camera with a plastic lens, and capture iconic locations and symbols that reveal a continuing series of human connections across different cultures.

Julian Rosefeldt, American Night (2009). Five-channel film installation, 40:42 min. (looped). Photo courtesy of Barbara Gross Galerie Munich, Arndt Berlin/Singapore, and the artist.
  • Julian Rosefeldt, American Night (2009). Five-channel film installation, 40:42 min. (looped). Photo courtesy of Barbara Gross Galerie Munich, Arndt Berlin/Singapore, and the artist.

Julian Rosefeldt: American Night
Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum
1 Brookings Drive | www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu
Opening 6:30-9 p.m. Fri., Mar. 4. Continues through Aug. 7.

You’ll swear that a certain squint-eyed, mustachioed man in Julian Rosefeldt’s five-channel film installation American Night is Charles Bronson — but you’ll be wrong. Instead, the man is another actor, one of several in the film who resembles an archetypal cowboy film star. American Night is shot in widescreen, 16mm CinemaScope — a popular format for the Western — and uses actual dialogue from classic films, George W. Bush’s speeches and footage of modern combat troops to show how the mythology of the Hollywood Western has infiltrated American culture and politics. It’s a long hard look at the fictions that drive our reality, as seen by an outsider (Rosefeldt is German).

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